Brooklyn Cruise to Nowhere

Get away by going nowhere.

A Brooklyn cruise to nowhere may not visit a new port, but that doesn't mean you won't go anywhere. The destination is the ship. For anyone looking for a "short but sweet" getaway, a cruise to nowhere could be the perfect pick.

Cruising to Nowhere

On a cruise to nowhere, passengers experience everything promised on a regular cruise:

  • Luxury accommodations: From suites to standard staterooms
  • Various dining options: Buffets, cafes, and bars
  • Activities: Swimming, dancing, shopping, and casino play
  • Relaxation: Spa treatments, tanning, and viewing sunsets
  • Entertainment: Las Vegas-style shows, lounges, and clubs

With all that cruise ships have to offer these days, a one- or two-day cruise to nowhere will never leave you bored. It's an ideal way for anyone unfamiliar with cruises to get up to speed in no time. It's also a good choice for experienced cruise travelers who need a "cruise fix" until they can take a longer voyage.

The Norwegian Gem for example sails one-day cruises from New York with prices starting at $200 per person. On board, passengers sample Norwegian Cruise Lines' patented "freestyle cruising." A few of the ship's highlights include 12 diverse restaurants, a mood-lit bowling alley, and a varied selection of piano bars, cigar bars, and espresso bars, all of which are available to you during an abbreviated cruise to nowhere.

A Manhattan or Brooklyn Cruise to Nowhere

Cruises to nowhere from New York run about two or three times a year. Check the cruise calendar to see if one sets sail at a good time for you. Also, check often. A new cruise to nowhere could pop up with little notice. Fortunately, not much time is needed to properly plan.

Because the cruises are so short, it's much easier to fit one into your schedule. Unlike regular cruises where you have to plan on being away for a week or more, a cruise to nowhere is like a weekend trip. A brief getaway that will get you home and back to work within a few days. In that time however, it gives you the chance to truly escape, and in the "City That Never Sleeps," such respite can be quite welcomed.

Two terminals serve New York, Manhattan and Brooklyn. Cruises to nowhere sail out of both ports and are often referred to as a New York Cruise to Nowhere. The only difference is the terminal. From New York State, ships sail out to the Atlantic Ocean for a specified time and then turn around for a leisurely cruise home. On the return trip, passengers get a spectacular view of New York City and its famed skyline.

Upcoming Itineraries Out of New York

Checking the upcoming schedule for New York, passengers have six cruises to choose from through 2011. Carnival Cruise Lines and Norwegian Cruise Line are the two main providers:

  • Norwegian Cruise Line: One-night cruises on the Norwegian Gem and Norwegian Jewel depart Saturday afternoon and return Sunday morning. Also, a two-night weekend cruise to nowhere on board the Norwegian Jewel is planned.
  • Carnival Cruise Lines: A two-night cruise on board the Miracle is planned for October 2009 and 2010.

Intro to New York Terminals

A Brooklyn cruise to nowhere simply means a cruise to nowhere departing from Brooklyn's Red Hook terminal. As said, New York has two main terminals: one out of Manhattan, the other from Brooklyn. Check to see which terminal your cruise departs from. The only thing that could fail you on your departure day is if you go to the wrong terminal. Even so though, the terminals are only 20 minutes apart (by car/taxi) and it's an easy enough task to get from one to the other. The terminals are eight miles apart. From one of these terminals, your cruise to nowhere awaits.

The Brooklyn Cruise Terminal

  • Located at Red Hook Terminal, Pier No. 12
  • Located across New York Harbor
  • Once the site of the nation's largest Coast Guard base
  • Highest profile ship: Queen Mary 2

The Manhattan Cruise Terminal

  • Located at 711 12th Avenue in New York
  • Dates back to the 1930s
  • Fourth busiest cruise terminal in the United States
  • A year-round terminal
  • Primary home port for trans-Atlantic crossings from Europe
Brooklyn Cruise to Nowhere